the storytelling

Jun. 29th, 2017 12:13 am
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[personal profile] boxofdelights
I went to the storytelling. I timed my walk right and got there at the start time, but it was so hot, even at 7 p.m., that I opted to go inside to buy a drink, and miss the start. And so did a lot of other people, so I missed the whole first storyteller.

It was a good turnout:cut for pic )There were more people sitting on a low wall behind me, and people standing at the side.

The second storyteller talked about encounters with coffee-snob baristas, and a visit to a coffee farm in Colombia. You could see that she had had some training, in storytelling or some other theater, when she described the landscape. She showed us how lovely it looked from far away, and then how it felt to walk down a cliff-face to pick the coffee cherries.

The third talked about her relationship with food: how her family encouraged her to be miserly with money and with calories; how boyfriends and their families encouraged her to take pleasure in eating and other indulgences; how food makes memories vivid, and memories of particular meals anchor her important friendships now. When she was describing her disordered eating, I thought, "This needs a trigger warning." Then, when she was describing food really sensually, I thought more generally about what we warn for, and what we should warn for. The point of storytelling is to use our words and our physicalities to put images in your mind.

The fourth talked about how growing up on a farm had made her familiar with birth and death, and affected her understanding of her own inevitable death. She described two corpses very vividly. A beloved horse, who had done "what horses do: lived a long, happy life, and then walked himself to the very back pasture, across a couple of irrigation ditches, and buckled his knees under the buckle of the mountain, and died." Unfortunately, on the other side of that fence was the kitchen window of a brand-new million-dollar home, built by a new neighbor who was not a farmer, who needed the corpse moved. The storyteller's mother explained that she could not get a rendering truck or a backhoe across those irrigation ditches, and she was going to let it rot, though the neighbor was welcome to move it if they could figure out how. The storyteller's mother hadn't liked that neighbor anyway. Those irrigation ditches had flooded, in the storyteller's childhood, severely enough to undermine the century-old tombstones in Bingham Hill Cemetery, which brings us to the second corpse. The storyteller's mother didn't mean to graverob, she just didn't want him to wash away.

This was a very good story.

The fifth talked about being a public radio journalist on the farm beat.

The sixth was a theater guy. He talked about being a city kid and going to his father's cousin's farm on holidays.

I learned something useful from the last storyteller, whose story didn't really have a structure: at the end, he said, "That's my story, thank you!" and everyone applauded. My stories tend to be small and oddly shaped, and leave my audience saying, "Wait, that's the story? You're done?" so I think I will try this tactic.
yhlee: Animated icon of sporkiness. (sporks (rilina))
[personal profile] yhlee
Lindy Mechefske claims to be doing an anthology of trans people's stories [Facebook link]. Of course, it includes this charmer:
We’d love to include some before and after photos.

Noooooooope.

In addition, I left two comments:

The first comment asked if they were planning on paying contributors. The answer was an equivocal "If there's any way to do this, yes." My second comment said that Mechefske ought to include information about the fact of payment (or non-payment) in the submissions guidelines so that people would know what they were getting into; that comment has been deleted. There was at least one other comment asking about payment, which has been deleted.

In conclusion: stay the hell away from this project. It smells rotten.

Lively week and half...

Jun. 28th, 2017 09:53 pm
catherineldf: (Default)
[personal profile] catherineldf
Our LGBTQ StoryBundle ends tomorrow - thus far, we have raised over $1000 for Rainbow Railroad and their program for LGBTQ+ refugees. This is pretty amazing - many, many thanks to everyone who bought or boosted the bundle! You can still get it tonight, if you've been putting it off, BTW. Some good reading in this batch.

Last week, I was interviewed by author Heather Rose Jones for her Lesbian Talk Show podcast. we had a fund discussion about my work and historical inspiration. That should go live in August. In the meantime, check out her blog and her show.

Last night, I read with a bunch of other authors at the annual Queer Voices Pride Month reading at the Minneapolis Central Library, sponsored by Intermedia Arts, the Hennepin County Library and Augsburg College. This year, there was a resource and book fair, along with the reading. The traffic and mass transit deities conspired to keep our crowd smallish, but the readings were very good, I sold a few books and I got interviewed for the KFAI Radio show Fresh Fruit (airing soon). I made the evening for one of my editors by reading from the magazine he edited (Raymond Luczak, Callisto), which was fun. I also got some nice feedback on the story I read from the audience and the ASL interpreters, which was very cool. One of the great things about last night's reading was the diversity of voices: over half the authors were authors of color, several authors were trans or genderqueer and at least one publicly identified as having a disability. More than one author identified as Muslim American. And the singing was lovely. I also got to see some friends, so I would definitely count the event as a success.

In upcoming events, Rachel Gold and I will be reading together at Boneshaker Books in Minneapolis in September and I'm talking to Quatrefoil Library and DreamHaven about possible events later on this year. Speaking of DreamHaven, I just typed up my first Queen of Swords Press invoice for them: they'll be carrying Silver Moon (new edition) and Out of This World: Queer Speculative Fiction Stories as of tomorrow evening! If you know an indie bookstore that might be interested, please send them our way. I'll be posting a bookstore contact to the web page in the next day or two here.

I've also got some new writing projects in the offing. And there's still time to pledge my Patreon for this month (proceeds going to the Southern Poverty Law Center).

And on a more fun note, I'll be at the Twin Cities Antiquarian Bookfair on Friday, shopping for books. Book dealer (and all around swell guy) David 
Christenson will be selling from books from the Lundoff Collection as well as some of Jana's fine bindings and boxes so be sure and stop by the Fairgrounds to check things out. I'm also hoping to do a Lark Toys run with friends, to be followed by 2 days of writing, with only minimal editing and other tasks. Fingers crossed that works out!

carbonel: (cubs)
[personal profile] carbonel
I know this is a strange request, but it would make me very happy to find an answer.

Is there any simple way to find out, for a Cubs game that has already taken place, if the Cubs won or lost the game without also seeing/hearing the final score?

I tried Siri, but it was overly helpful, giving me more information than I wanted.

What I've been watching lately

Jun. 28th, 2017 06:13 pm
carbonel: (tivo)
[personal profile] carbonel
A very mixed bag via Netflix streaming and DVD.

The bad:

The OA
Someone on LJ/DW recommended this, which is why I watched the first season via Netflix. Oh, this is bad. So bad. Bad in the same way that Lost was bad, in that it feels as if the scriptwriters are just making it up as they go. It starts with a woman in a nightgown standing on the edge of a bridge with a substantial drop. She jumps, and is apparently totally unharmed. There are a series of flashbacks, and the final episode gets to the point where she was abandoned -- and there's no indication of how she got from lonely road to well-traveled bridge without any interim. Maybe there's supposed to be more plot in-between, but that wasn't the feeling I got. It's supposed to be about near-death experiences, but it's all just made-up woo.

Inception
Okay, this isn't actually bad. It was a blockbuster, and hugely successful. But it wasn't my cup of tea. I kept watching it from a meta point of view: "here's a fight scene" and "oh, here's another fight scene, and next we'll have a chase scene" and "oh, cool special effect." And there was a whole lot of the Eight Deadly Words.

The good (mostly):

Anne with an "E"
Another series I watched on Netflix. I mostly enjoyed this, though I side-eye a bit at the way it's plotted to ramp up the angst levels. In this story (spoilers!) Anne is sent back to the orphanage for stealing Marilla's brooch, instead of being threatened with not being able to attend a church picnic. And the final couple of episodes deal with the prospect of financial ruin as the result of a ship sinking (without insurance) and some bad choices. And I'm pretty sure a lot of the idioms used were not extant in the period the series is set. But Anne is pitch-perfect, and Matthew is much less of a cipher than he was in the books, and I'm looking forward to the next season.

Grace and Frankie
Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Sam Waterston, and Martin Sheen. I don't usually watch shows for the actors, but in this case I'll make an exception. The initial premise is that there are two couples in their early 70s whose wives don't really get along. They have dinner together, and the men announce that they've been having an affair for 25 years, and are now divorcing the wives to marry each other. Much hilarity does not ensue. The two women end up living together, despite their exceedingly different everything, and manage to make a go of the (platonic) relationship. Very quirky, but doesn't trip my "sitcom, ick" button.

Also, a bunch of a nature documentaries narrated by David Attenborough. When I need soothing, there's nothing like bugs or polar bears or frogs.
lsanderson: (Default)
[personal profile] lsanderson
A Letter From the Editor
By SAM SIFTON
This is an important day in the history of NYT Cooking.

SOCIAL STUDIES
The newly diverse crowd at the Abbey, a popular gay bar in West Hollywood, Calif., has drawn complaints from some of the regulars.
How ‘Gay’ Should a Gay Bar Be?
By JIM FARBER
What does the label even mean in a time of sexual fluidity? And what about the ‘bachelorette party’ problem?

ABC Settles with Meat Producer in ‘Pink Slime’ Defamation Case
By DANIEL VICTOR
The network did not apologize or retract its reports, which questioned the safety of a common meat product.

Susan Ungaro will step down as president of the James Beard Foundation, effective Dec. 31, after 11 years at its helm.
James Beard Foundation President Will Step Down
By FLORENCE FABRICANT 1:03 PM ET
Susan Ungaro, who helped lead the culinary organization back from a financial scandal, plans to retire at the end of the year.

Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
By STEPHANIE STROM
The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

U.S. Suspends Beef Imports From Brazil
By DOM PHILLIPS
The decision by the Department of Agriculture, citing safety concerns, is a blow to Brazil’s meat industry, which is reeling from bribery accusations.

Take Feta. Add Frites. Stir in European Food Rules. Fight.
By JAMES KANTER
European Union regulations protecting consumers and preserving culinary cultures often create tension, sometimes even with the United States.

PROTOTYPE
Karina Garcia, 23, at her home in Riverside, Calif. Ms. Garcia is a YouTube celebrity famous for her slime videos.
Feel the Noise: Homemade Slime Becomes Big Business
By CLAIRE MARTIN
The market for slime — a sticky substance in a multitude of colors — is thriving in a cottage industry run by fourth-graders, teenagers and young adults.

A 20-Pound Lobster Impresses Airport Security, but It’s No Record Breaker
By MATTHEW HAAG
A passenger took the colossal crustacean through Boston Logan International Airport, but it was no match for Big Jake.

The Most Delicious Summer on Record
By THE NEW YORK TIMES
Advice for camp cooking, picnics and potlucks, along with recipes, cocktails, frozen desserts and a taste-test of the best supermarket hot dogs.
Jason Fujikuni

Grab Your Picnic Baskets: The Party’s Moving Outside
By TEJAL RAO
Experienced outdoor diners say planning is crucial: scouting a spot, bringing the right extras and finding a spot on the menu for fried chicken.

Picnic Ideas From the Fortnum & Mason Cookbook
By FLORENCE FABRICANT
Written by the British food critic Tom Parker Bowles, this cookbook includes English recipes for a plethora of stately occasions.

The 10 hot dogs that were part of the taste test, clockwise from top left: Applegate, Nathan’s, Oscar Mayer, Wellshire Farms, Boar’s Head, Trader Joe’s, Niman Ranch, Ball Park, Brooklyn Hot Dog Company and Hebrew National.



We Taste-Tested 10 Hot Dogs. Here Are the Best.
By JULIA MOSKIN
Sam Sifton, Melissa Clark and Julia Moskin tried 10 hot dogs for cookout season.
Want to Choose the Best Hot Dogs? Learn What the Labels Mean

Upscale Food and Gear Bring Campsite Cooking Out of the Wild
By KIM SEVERSON
A new generation of campers is making Instagram-ready meals, aided by lighter equipment and new options for fresh food and coffee.

The Secret to a Great Potluck? It’s Not the Food
By MELISSA CLARK
Everyone wins when a group meal is carefully planned.
Recipes: Pickled Deviled Eggs | Tomato and Zucchini Casserole With Crisp Cheddar Topping

EAT
Kubaneh (Yemeni pull-apart rolls).
Before Croissants, There Was Kubaneh, a Jewish Yemeni Delight
By TEJAL RAO
Sweet and supple, this bread is shot through with fat to create a melting, airy bread.
Recipe: Kubaneh (Yemeni Pull-Apart Rolls)
EAT
A Gazpacho Recipe to Follow — Then Discard
By SAMIN NOSRAT
Gazpacho.
Gentl and Hyers for The New York Times
Sometimes creating the best version of a classic dish requires you to taste your way to perfection.
Recipe: Gazpacho

COOKING
How to Make Ice Cream
By MELISSA CLARK
In this guide, you will learn how to make four essential ice cream base recipes — custard, Philadelphia-style, nondairy and no-churn — and look at flavorings, mix-ins and toppings.


The Joys of a Classic Ice Cream Sandwich
By SAMANTHA SENEVIRATNE
The hand-held combination of a chocolate base and vanilla ice cream is sure to please everyone.
Recipes: Ice Cream Sandwiches


George Clooney’s Tequila Company Sold for Up to $1 Billion
By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED
Casamigos, which the actor founded with the entertainment impresario Rande Gerber, drew the attention of the spirits giant Diageo.

These Drinks Have a Secret
By ALISON ROMAN
For those who yearn for the crisp, complex notes of wine or a cocktail but don’t necessarily want the alcohol content, there’s the mocktail.

Three rosé cocktails, from left: City of Rosés, Rosé Royale and Sagaponack sangria.
Rosé Makes a Peachy Base for Summer Cocktails
By FLORENCE FABRICANT
The wine adds freshness, flavor and color to several popular new drinks.

20 Wines Under $20: The Savory Side of Rosé
By ERIC ASIMOV
The best rosés hide among the annual deluge of fashionable summer wines. Seek them out and find a delicious reward.


Alain Senderens, a Chef Who Modernized French Food, Dies at 77
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Mr. Senderens, one of the most adventurous of the founding fathers of nouvelle cuisine, produced dishes that could entice and, on occasion, shock.

Not seen in the New York Times

Jun. 28th, 2017 01:57 pm
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
[personal profile] mme_hardy
... but sent to it, this biting and incisive letter from its copy editors.

After we were compared to dogs urinating on fire hydrants when we edited stories, in an internal report that called for the elimination of "low-value editing" and made it all but clear which stages of editing this referred to — so much so that it became a running joke among the copy desks for months ("How's the low-value editing going in your section today?") — along with the report's implication that copy editing was merely finding "easily identifiable errors, such as spelling and grammar mistakes";
 
After some of us were recruited for "editing tests" to streamline the process, or, as it turned out, figure out how to make our own jobs obsolete;


After we were told that to remain employed, we would have to apply for new "strong editor" positions meant to be a hybrid of the two types of editors at The Times, backfielders and copy editors, and realized only copy editors had to be reevaluated categorically;

 

After we were told that this "restructuring" would also reduce our numbers by more than half;

After completing a first round of interviews, some held by interviewers who clearly had not even read our résumés and cover letters, and competing against the very colleagues we are leaning on in these times;


Read the whole damn thing.

(no subject)

Jun. 28th, 2017 08:14 pm
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] rmc28!
laramie: (Default)
[personal profile] laramie
Because you've been so good:
Sometime Soon
– tto 'Someday Soon'  Lyrics by Laramie Sasseville


Dishes stacked up in the sink, utensils, pots and pans,

From meals in which I have partaken,

Some just in from supper and some from who knows when,

Sometime soon, gonna wash  ‘em, sometime soon.

 

I really do not like to see that grungy bathtub ring,

Scale build-up on fixtures leaves me cryin’

I would take a scrub brush to the whole dang thing -

Sometime soon, gonna scrub it sometime soon.

 

But there’s no time to clean,

I’ve got more urgent chores to do,

Guess it’s cause I’m a writer with a day job too…

 

So grow, you dirty dish stack, grow you dust piles, too

My next book launches in just eighteen days -

I love my books and stories more than I love things clean,

Sometime soon, gonna scrub it, sometime soon.

 

But there’s no time to clean, I’ve got more urgent chores to do,

Guess it’s cause I’m a writer with a day job too…

 

So grow, you dirty dish stack, grow you dust piles, too

My next book launches in just fourteen days -

I love my books and stories more than I love things clean,

Sometime soon, gonna wash 'em, sometime soon.

Sometime soon, gonna scrub it, sometime soon.

 

Seen on my timeline

Jun. 28th, 2017 12:41 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Note: link leads to facebook.

[added: link nuked due to pay issues and reaction to questions about pay]

Lindy Mechefske posts
Thrilled to be working with Ruth Wood on an anthology of transgender stories. We are interested in stories from anyone under the transgender umbrella as well as stories from the people close to them. We are looking for stories from people anywhere in the world so please share this widely. Submission details below.
PLEASE SHARE WIDELY! Read more... )

Yours truly, Jack the Ripper

Jun. 28th, 2017 06:33 am
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
[personal profile] truepenny
Q1: More about Jack the Ripper! Who do you think did it?
Q2: Research -- do you plan your approach, or is it more freeform/serendipitous/falling down rabbit holes?
Q3: Are you exclusively reading true crime? If so, what's that been like? If not, what else are you reading?
[each from a different and lovely reader]


Read more... )
oursin: Photograph of small impressionistic metal figurine seated reading a book (Reader)
[personal profile] oursin

What I read

Finished A Banquet of Consequences, and, okay, family that makes the Starkadders look like the Waltons at the centre of the plot. But at least Havers is somewhat on the way to rehabilitation and not being transferred, and while I am not convinced by Lynley's new affair (I consider his new squeeze is entirely prudent to maintain high boundaries), I don't think I ever wanted to have at him with a codfish at any point in the narrative.

Allie Brosh, Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened (2013), found in a local charity shop. Raced through it though on reflection not sure that it wouldn't be better read in doses.

Gave up on the romance about marrying an earl.

On the go

Max Gladstone, Two Serpents Rise (2013) - still not quite feeling it for the Craft Sequence - it's well-done, it's not doing anything I dislike, and yet somehow I feel unabsorbed.

Also picked up in a local charity shop, Jeremy Reed, The Dilly: A Secret History of Piccadilly Rent Boys (2014), which is really, really, annoying. It could be a much better book if the author wasn't so in love with his gosh-wow prose and his vision of the sexual outlaw, not to mention, checking his bloody facts - there were two chronological bloopers in the first 20 pages, a Tory politician described as a Labour MP, a confusion between the Stones' Hyde Park concert and Altamont. Also, how can anyone possibly tell if 'most' late Victorian homosexuals were being blackmailed? The book comes from a publisher I had previously considered reputable, but does not seem to have been copy-edited (this might have done something about the Did Not Do His Research factor and the annoying repetition of favoured phrases) or proof-read, and given that some passages appear to have been written while stoned and there are sentences which are not and places where you think, that is so not the word you want there, this would have improved one's reading experience considerably. There's some really interesting material there but unfortunately the generally cavalier attitude to checkable facts makes me a bit sceptical about his ethnography of gay London, or rather, the gay West End, from Wilde to the era of AIDS. I'm also wondering whether there is any unacknowledged debt to e.g. work by Matt Cook and Matt Houlbrook.

And, finally released this week as ebook (there were hard copies at Wiscon but I was in travelling mode), Liz Bourke, Sleeping with Monsters: Readings and Reactions in Science Fiction and Fantasy (2017).

Up next

No idea.

Charles Hamilton Sorley, d. 1918

Jun. 27th, 2017 09:24 pm
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
[personal profile] mme_hardy
A good WWI poem, to take the last out of your mouth.

 When you see millions of the mouthless dead
Across your dreams in pale battalions go,
Say not soft things as other men have said,
That you'll remember. For you need not so.
Give them not praise. For, deaf, how should they know
It is not curses heaped on each gashed head?
Nor tears. Their blind eyes see not your tears flow.
Nor honour. It is easy to be dead.
Say only this, “They are dead.” Then add thereto,
“Yet many a better one has died before.”
Then, scanning all the o'ercrowded mass, should you
Perceive one face that you loved heretofore,
It is a spook. None wears the face you knew.
Great death has made all his for evermore.

Strange artifacts

Jun. 27th, 2017 09:12 pm
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
[personal profile] mme_hardy
I was looking for the text of a song I sang (as part of a chorus) in college; it was a setting of Sara Teasdale's "Pierrot stands in a garden".  I fell over a 19-teens anthology that is entirely poems about Pierrot.    I remember reading Murder Must Advertise and having no idea at all who Pierrot, Pierrette, and Columbine were.   Why did the Commedia dell'arte characters make so little of a lasting mark in American culture?  (Or, can it be, in my head?)

edit: I have just run into the section of WW1 poems about Pierrot.  Bizarre.

PIERROT AT WAR
A Year ago in Carnival
We danced till break of day;
A year ago in Carnival
The boulevards were gay;
And roses shook the whispering air,
Like a great sibilant soft fanfare.
 
In Carnival, in Carnival,
A Prince of Magic comes,
To the sound of fifes, and the sound of horns,
And the sound of little drums.

A year ago in Carnival,
The lamps along the quays
Lay softer on the misty night
Than stars in leafy trees,
And down the ribboned sparkling street
Pierrot ran on twinkling feet.
 
Ah year! — There is no Carnival:
The north burns dusky red,
And on the white of Pierrot's brow
Is a long scar instead;
While ever the muttering runs
From the bleeding lips of the guns.
 
This year, this year at Carnival 
A Prince of Magic comes, 
With blood-red crest against the sky 
And a snarl of angry drums. 
 
Maxwell Struthers Hurt

sovay: (Psholtii: in a bad mood)
[personal profile] sovay
I have had an absolutely rotten day, in which I think I can safely say that the best thing that happened to me was getting rated a "Yiddish flirting expert" by YIVO in an online quiz. (I mean, I don't know about that, but I can certainly read Yiddish well enough to translate those pick-up lines. I'd love to know where they came from.) I am also entertained to learn that the Massachusetts Historical Society has been tracking John Quincy Adams across the sea thanks to his daily habit of recording latitude and longitude on transatlantic voyages. Other than that, I wish it had been logistically possible for me to spend the day in bed.

[edit] After watching Vincente Minnelli's The Band Wagon (1953), I actually feel better. I love when that works. The "Girl Hunt Ballet" is even funnier if you have spent the last year and change immersed in pulp fiction and still bounced off Mickey Spillane.

Fig and Ibid on their current home

Jun. 27th, 2017 11:31 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Fig thinks everything is the best thing ever, especially the completely adorable orange cat. Who would like the stranger to stop gazing affectionately at him.

Ibid, on the other hand, won't come out from behind the toilet.

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